The extra tension of external access, video conferencing and the use of VPNs can cause some problems for the internet infrastructure. Domestic broadband for customers served by the obsolete copper wire network would first be affected and could see a data bottleneck (inventory)

Working from home as a precaution against coronavirus can ‘tax the internet’

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The extra tension of external access, video conferencing and the use of VPNs can cause some problems for the internet infrastructure. Domestic broadband for customers served by the obsolete copper wire network would first be affected and could see a data bottleneck (inventory)

Self-isolating and working from home as a precaution against coronavirus can overload broadband networks and cause internet bottlenecks, experts warn

  • Many companies have implemented a mandatory work from home policy
  • It is hoped that avoiding offices will prevent employees from contracting coronavirus
  • Experts warn that the added voltage can cause some connection problems
  • Domestic broadband with old copper wires can cause data bottlenecks

Many companies have implemented a mandatory work from home policy as a precaution against coronavirus, but broad acceptance can lead to problems with the internet connection, experts warn.

The extra tension of external access, video conferencing and the use of VPNs can cause some problems for the internet infrastructure.

Domestic broadband for customers served by an outdated copper wire network would be the hardest hit and could cause data bottlenecks.

Technology companies with high data requirements, such as Twitter, Google, Facebook and Microsoft, are among the companies that ban staff from their offices.

The virus has so far infected more than 100,000 people around the world, including 163 in the UK, and killed at least 3,400 people.

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The extra tension of external access, video conferencing and the use of VPNs can cause some problems for the internet infrastructure. Domestic broadband for customers served by the obsolete copper wire network would first be affected and could see a data bottleneck (inventory)

The extra tension of external access, video conferencing and the use of VPNs can cause some problems for the internet infrastructure. Domestic broadband for customers served by the obsolete copper wire network would first be affected and could see a data bottleneck (inventory)

Lisa Pierce, a network expert at Gartner in the US, said Bloomberg Quint: ‘The weak link in the chain, where the system can become overloaded, becomes the home broadband network.

“People will hit congestion, just like a highway, where the speed goes from 60 miles per hour to 20.”

But Mrs. Pierce’s fears are not shared by Openreach, the UK’s largest provider of broadband homes.

BT’s telecom company told MailOnline that it was built to support a so-called ‘evening peak’ network capacity, which is defined as ten times the typical demand during the day (working hours).

This peak in internet use comes from the data-intensive video streaming of films, TV programs and sports.

The company is convinced that working from home can handle a large scale, as could happen if the COVID-19 virus worsens.

Customers with slow internet, served by the outdated copper wire network, are the first to be hit.

The chance that the internet will be completely overwhelmed is small, but some disruption is possible.

Technology companies that place high demands on data, such as Twitter, Google, Facebook and Microsoft, are among the companies that ban staff from its offices. The virus has infected more than 100,000 people worldwide, including 163 in the UK, and killed 3,400 people

Technology companies that have high data requirements, such as Twitter, Google, Facebook and Microsoft, are among the companies that ban staff from their offices. The virus has infected more than 100,000 people worldwide, including 163 in the UK, and killed 3,400 people

Technology companies that have high data requirements, such as Twitter, Google, Facebook and Microsoft, are among the companies that ban staff from their offices. The virus has infected more than 100,000 people worldwide, including 163 in the UK, and killed 3,400 people

Jeff McElfresh, CEO of AT&T Communications, said: “Video is already 70 percent of all network traffic.

“The moment you add video conferences to all the shows that the kids watch because schools are closed, it can be a problem if everyone tries to hurry up at the same time.”

Massive working from home is full of dangers, such as recent comments by Dr. Asma Adnane from the University of Loughborough reveal that it increases the chance of hacking.

Because they are out of the office and have no access to a secure local network, devices are provided with weak security settings.

Dr. Adnane recommends the use of a Virtual Private Network (VPN), which encrypts data that travels between a user’s computer and the work network.

It is predicted that if the coronavirus outbreak worsens, up to a fifth of UK workers could be sick.

Today, Facebook and Microsoft, together with other American technology companies, have introduced a new policy to stop the spread of deadly corona virus.

Facebook told employees in the San Francisco Bay offices to stay home and cancel all business trips due to the virus.

HOW TO PREVENT CORONAVIRUS CATCHING

Shoppers have to pay with contactless cards to prevent them from picking up the corona virus of a dirty banknote, health experts have said.

A World Health Organization spokesperson said that contactless cards “can reduce the risk of transmission.”

Notes change hands hundreds or even thousands of times during circulation and can pick up all kinds of dirt and insects when they are shown around.

Experts say that the corona virus can be linked to currencies in the same way that it can live on hard surfaces such as door knobs, handrails and toilet handles.

The use of contactless cards – meaning that someone only needs to touch their own card, which is never dealt with by someone else – can protect them from spreading.

The advice is because employers are said to have started banning hot-desking when people share desks; and in France, ministers have told people to stop doing ‘la bise’, the traditional cheek kiss greeting.

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