Minneapolis-based police officer Derek Chauvin on trial for George Floyd’s death

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Derek Chauvin, the white Minneapolis police officer charged on May 25 with murdering George Floyd, will face trial for the first time on Monday

White Minneapolis agent Derek Chauvin, accused of murdering George Floyd, will first appear in court today – two weeks after the black man’s death sparked protests in the United States.

  • Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is charged with first-degree murder in the death of George Floyd on May 25
  • He was filmed kneeling on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes as he gasped and repeatedly groaned, “Please, I can’t breathe.”
  • Chauvin, who was fired from the Minneapolis Police Department, was initially charged with murder and third-degree manslaughter
  • His first court appearance in Minneapolis on Monday comes as a public viewing for Floyd in Houston, Texas
  • Chauvin is sentenced to 40 years in prison
  • Minneapolis councilors have since pledged to dismantle and rebuild police after Floyd’s death

Derek Chauvin, the white Minneapolis police officer charged on May 25 with murdering George Floyd, will face trial for the first time on Monday

Derek Chauvin, the white Minneapolis police officer charged on May 25 with murdering George Floyd, will face trial for the first time on Monday

The white Minneapolis police officer accused of murdering George Floyd is on trial for the first time on Monday – two weeks after the black man’s death sparked protests over police brutality in the United States.

Derek Chauvin is charged with first-degree murder in Floyd’s death on May 25 after kneeling on the 46-year-old’s neck for nearly nine minutes, gasping and groaning, “Please, I can’t breathe.”

Chauvin, who was fired from the Minneapolis Police Department, was initially charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter before again charged with second-degree murder last week.

His first court appearance in Minneapolis on Monday comes as a public viewing for Floyd in Houston, Texas.

Chauvin is sentenced to 40 years in prison.

Three other officers on the scene – Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao – have each been charged with complicity in murder and manslaughter.

Chauvin is defended by Eric Nelson of the Halberg Criminal Defense firm and is cared for by the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association.

George Floyd (pictured) said 'I can't breathe' when Agent Derek Chauvin knelt in the neck for eight minutes

George Floyd (pictured) said 'I can't breathe' when Agent Derek Chauvin knelt in the neck for eight minutes

Derek Chauvin is charged with first-degree murder in Floyd’s death on May 25 after kneeling on the 46-year-old’s neck for nearly nine minutes, gasping and gasping, “Please, I can’t breathe.”

The move comes after more than a week of protests - which have turned violent at times - over the murder of George Floyd, who was choked while arrested for allegedly using a $ 20 counterfeit bill

The move comes after more than a week of protests - which have turned violent at times - over the murder of George Floyd, who was choked while arrested for allegedly using a $ 20 counterfeit bill

The move comes after more than a week of protests – which have turned violent at times – over the murder of George Floyd, who was choked while arrested for allegedly using a $ 20 counterfeit bill

Nelson has represented many police officers, often in shootings involving officers, but none have been charged or brought to trial, a source told Reuters.

He also represented Amy Senser, wife of former Minnesota Vikings professional football player Joe Senser, who was convicted of the hit-and-run death of a Minneapolis chef in 2011. She was sentenced to 41 months in prison.

Halberg has 10 lawyers and is the largest Minnesota law firm that does criminal work only. Nelson is the managing partner.

His court action comes a day after Minneapolis councilors promised to dismantle and rebuild police after Floyd’s death.

“We are going to dismantle the Minneapolis police,” Councilor Jeremiah Ellis said on Twitter.

“And when we’re done, we’re not just going to glue it back together. We are going to dramatically reconsider how we approach public safety and emergency relief. ‘

Minneapolis councilors have vowed to abolish the city's `` toxic '' police and reinvest the money in community projects aimed at preventing crime in a historic movement (pictured, councilors speak to protesters)

Minneapolis councilors have vowed to abolish the city's `` toxic '' police and reinvest the money in community projects aimed at preventing crime in a historic movement (pictured, councilors speak to protesters)

Minneapolis councilors have vowed to abolish the city’s “ toxic ” police and reinvest the money in community projects aimed at preventing crime in a historic movement (pictured, councilors speak to protesters)

Mayor Jacob Frey, 38 (pictured), was booed over the weekend by protesters after refusing to support the police repression demand - and councilors now have an overwhelming majority, meaning he can't block the move

Mayor Jacob Frey, 38 (pictured), was booed over the weekend by protesters after refusing to support the police repression demand - and councilors now have an overwhelming majority, meaning he can't block the move

Mayor Jacob Frey, 38 (pictured), was booed over the weekend by protesters after refusing to support the police repression demand – and councilors now have an overwhelming majority, meaning he can’t block the move

The move to “ expose the police ” predates the current protests, but has gained new support since the video about the incident over a week later led to sometimes violent protests that caused dozens of US cities in decades of unrest in the worst civil unrest in decades.

The Minneapolis Council has not yet formally discussed the recovery or redesign of its police force, but council chairman Lisa Bender told CNN that a majority was in favor.

“We are committed to dismantling the police as we know them in the city of Minneapolis and working with our community to build a new model of public security that actually protects our community,” said Bender.

However, Minneapolis mayor Jacob Frey is against getting rid of the department and head of the city’s powerful police union, Bob Kroll, who took to the stage last year with President Donald Trump.

The vow of the majority of councilors came a day after Frey was booed and asked to leave a ‘Defund the Police’ meeting. He later said that he supported “massive structural reforms to overhaul this structurally racist system”, but did not “abolish the entire police department.”

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