Crocodile caught swimming with its webbed feet extended in NT’s Cahills Crossing


Even crocodiles are socially distant! Tourist captures hilarious moment as crocodile floats through infamous creek with outstretched feet

  • Belinda Steindorf was visiting Kakadu’s Cahills Crossing when she saw the crocodile
  • She joked that the large animal in the river appeared to be “socially distant.”
  • Leading crocodile expert, Grahame Webb, said it could try to catch fish

A crocodile has been caught floating in a river with outstretched webbed feet in what one amused tourist joked was ‘social distancing’.

Belinda Steindorf, from Adelaide, had been visiting the infamous Cahills Crossing of the Northern Territory in Kakadu National Park last week when she saw the crocodile swimming with its limbs wide apart.

‘It was quite funny to watch! All of the NT National Park social distance signs say to keep a little crocodile distance from each other. The crocodiles here seem to have really taken that on board! Ms Steindorf told Daily Mail Australia.

“Or they followed the tourists closely.”

A crocodile was caught swimming outstretched across Cahills Crossing in the Northern Territory

A crocodile was caught swimming outstretched across Cahills Crossing in the Northern Territory

Mrs. Steindorf said she saw as many as 40 crocodiles in the area last week when she crossed the river with her partner

Mrs. Steindorf said she saw as many as 40 crocodiles in the area last week when she crossed the river with her partner

Mrs. Steindorf said she saw as many as 40 crocodiles in the area last week when she crossed the river with her partner

Mrs. Steindorf said she and her partner saw as many as 40 crocodiles swimming through the crossing and had never seen such behaviors.

‘We assumed they were using their hands to try and position themselves better in the emerging current in anticipation of the fish! Very intelligent creatures, ”she said.

The tourist snapped some photos of the spectacular encounter, but added that she made sure to drive across the intersection at low tide to avoid becoming a crocodile lunch.

‘Our Kakadu caravan was built to handle the Australian outback conditions, although with 40 crocs we could see floating close by, we didn’t take any chances and waited until low tide to ensure a safe crossing,’ she said.

Despite the crocodile’s bizarre behavior, experts have yet to pinpoint exactly why the animals behave that way.

The tourist said she saw as many as 40 crocodiles in the area during her visit last week

The tourist said she saw as many as 40 crocodiles in the area during her visit last week

The tourist said she saw as many as 40 crocodiles in the area during her visit last week

One of the big animals swam down the river with a fish in its mouth

One of the big animals swam down the river with a fish in its mouth

One of the big animals swam down the river with a fish in its mouth

Professor Grahame Webb, one of the state’s foremost experts on crocodiles, said the predator’s unusual foot position was likely a hunting technique.

“It has been described and photographed in East Alligator River and appears to be related to the interception of fish,” he said. NT News.

Cahills Crossing attracts thousands of tourists every year.

But the area is also extremely dangerous, with five deaths to date, including tourists, photographers and fishermen.

Video footage captured the terrifying moment when a couple was trapped in the middle of Cahills Crossing (pictured), a popular spot in Kakadu National Park, notorious for saltwater crocodiles

Video footage captured the terrifying moment when a couple was trapped in the middle of Cahills Crossing (pictured), a popular spot in Kakadu National Park, notorious for saltwater crocodiles

Video footage captured the terrifying moment when a couple was trapped in the middle of Cahills Crossing (pictured), a popular spot in Kakadu National Park, notorious for saltwater crocodiles

Last month, Rachelle Wastle and her husband Peter were driving through the intersection when they were blocked by a dozen crocodiles.

Frightening video footage shows the couple’s car submerged in water as they attempted to cross to the other side of the river.

The most famous death in the area was of a 40-year-old man, Kerry McLoughlin, who was tragically taken and beheaded by a crocodile in 1987.

THE CROSSING OF CAHILLS

The infamous Cahills Crossing is only a few feet wide, but it is one of Australia’s most dangerous waters.

Along with changing tides, the water current is strong enough to topple vehicles and serves as a breeding ground for saltwater crocodiles.

Dozens of divers attempt to venture across the submerged intersection, but are eventually washed up in crocodile-infested waters.

Many died, including fishermen, photographers and backpackers.

Crocodile expert Grahame Webb said that for every crocodile you can see, there are 10 you can’t.

The most famous fatal accident at the Crossing was in 1897 when 40-year-old Kerry McLoughlin was beheaded by a crocodile while on a fishing trip.

Rangers counted 120 crocodiles in the six-kilometer stretch around Cahills Crossing.

Five people have died in the area so far.

Sources: Venture North and news.com.au

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